Julia a nurse on dating in ukraine

Due to rapid adjustments in exchange rates, the dollar value of Ukrainian salaries and costs of living changed dramatically in 2013-2015. The hryvnia value of wages slightly increased at the same time.

(Read the report on the actual trial below.) The dollar value of an average Ukrainian salary dropped about 2 times since mid-2013, due to the exchange rate fluctuations: 49-62% depending on the region.

The map below demonstrates how the average salary changed by the region since June 2013.

17 September 2015 Ukrainian Rada approved a raise in the official minimum of the costs of living from 1176 to 1330 hryvnia/month, and the minimum salary from 1218 to 1378 hryvnia/month.

The changes will be implemented from 1 December 2015.

Accordingly, the minimum hourly wages changed from 7.29 to 8.25 hryvnia (

Half of his “salary” allowance the journalist allocated to paying for electricity and communal services for his apartment, which he owns, and purchasing a monthly travel pass for public transport.

Chistyakov purchased the pass for 200 hryvnia (.17), and left 400 (.35) for bills at the end of the month.

An unexpected health problem, a strained ankle, forced him to fork out 100 hryvnia (.59), which he had to spend on buying the cheapest bandage in a pharmacy. “I am happy that the experiment is finished,” the brave writer announced at the end.

The trip to the doctor was covered by the medical insurance. “I don’t feel very well.” His dog was another expense that he realized was unaffordable for a person on a minimal salary.

Chistyakov lived mostly on vegetable soups, breads, and porridges, forced to purchase the cheapest (damaged) vegetables in the markets, in order to fit in his monthly budget. For 2 weeks his friends were looking after the dog, but the last weeks he had to feed the dog by himself.

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Due to rapid adjustments in exchange rates, the dollar value of Ukrainian salaries and costs of living changed dramatically in 2013-2015. The hryvnia value of wages slightly increased at the same time. (Read the report on the actual trial below.) The dollar value of an average Ukrainian salary dropped about 2 times since mid-2013, due to the exchange rate fluctuations: 49-62% depending on the region.The map below demonstrates how the average salary changed by the region since June 2013.17 September 2015 Ukrainian Rada approved a raise in the official minimum of the costs of living from 1176 to 1330 hryvnia/month, and the minimum salary from 1218 to 1378 hryvnia/month.The changes will be implemented from 1 December 2015.Accordingly, the minimum hourly wages changed from 7.29 to 8.25 hryvnia ($0.33 to $0.38 per hour).Official minimum costs of living for different categories of people (per month): However, experts say that the real costs of living in Ukraine are higher than even the newly modified official numbers.

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Due to rapid adjustments in exchange rates, the dollar value of Ukrainian salaries and costs of living changed dramatically in 2013-2015. The hryvnia value of wages slightly increased at the same time.

(Read the report on the actual trial below.) The dollar value of an average Ukrainian salary dropped about 2 times since mid-2013, due to the exchange rate fluctuations: 49-62% depending on the region.

The map below demonstrates how the average salary changed by the region since June 2013.

17 September 2015 Ukrainian Rada approved a raise in the official minimum of the costs of living from 1176 to 1330 hryvnia/month, and the minimum salary from 1218 to 1378 hryvnia/month.

The changes will be implemented from 1 December 2015.

Accordingly, the minimum hourly wages changed from 7.29 to 8.25 hryvnia ($0.33 to $0.38 per hour).

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Half of his “salary” allowance the journalist allocated to paying for electricity and communal services for his apartment, which he owns, and purchasing a monthly travel pass for public transport.

Chistyakov purchased the pass for 200 hryvnia ($9.17), and left 400 ($18.35) for bills at the end of the month.

An unexpected health problem, a strained ankle, forced him to fork out 100 hryvnia ($4.59), which he had to spend on buying the cheapest bandage in a pharmacy. “I am happy that the experiment is finished,” the brave writer announced at the end.

The trip to the doctor was covered by the medical insurance. “I don’t feel very well.” His dog was another expense that he realized was unaffordable for a person on a minimal salary.

Chistyakov lived mostly on vegetable soups, breads, and porridges, forced to purchase the cheapest (damaged) vegetables in the markets, in order to fit in his monthly budget. For 2 weeks his friends were looking after the dog, but the last weeks he had to feed the dog by himself.

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Half of his “salary” allowance the journalist allocated to paying for electricity and communal services for his apartment, which he owns, and purchasing a monthly travel pass for public transport.Chistyakov purchased the pass for 200 hryvnia ($9.17), and left 400 ($18.35) for bills at the end of the month.An unexpected health problem, a strained ankle, forced him to fork out 100 hryvnia ($4.59), which he had to spend on buying the cheapest bandage in a pharmacy. “I am happy that the experiment is finished,” the brave writer announced at the end.The trip to the doctor was covered by the medical insurance. “I don’t feel very well.” His dog was another expense that he realized was unaffordable for a person on a minimal salary.Chistyakov lived mostly on vegetable soups, breads, and porridges, forced to purchase the cheapest (damaged) vegetables in the markets, in order to fit in his monthly budget. For 2 weeks his friends were looking after the dog, but the last weeks he had to feed the dog by himself.This forced him to save even more on his own meals.The same with dating: The single guy could only afford to take his date for a walk or watch a free movie in a park.“It’s OK now, but what do you do when it becomes colder and starts raining? Buying drinks or even a coffee in a cafe would be unaffordable, he concluded.Dmitry managed to purchase 2 shirts (10 hryvnia each) at a second hand shop.“To buy warmer clothing, one would have to save for months,” he stated.He doesn’t mention the costs of Internet and mobile phone, which are negligible in Ukraine.

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